Dancing With Flamingos: A Celebration of My Youngest Son

dancing with flamingos

Parenting my youngest child has been quite an adventure. He is funny, kind, smart, creative, exuberant, and autistic. Every day, it seems, he teaches me something new. His unique perspective on the world is often surprising, and the way he fully engages with whatever experience life has to offer is a constant delight.

Something that happened during a recent trip to the zoo is a perfect example. We were watching a flock of flamingos when suddenly they all began to vocalize at once. It sounded like a bunch of noise to me, but I noticed that my son had begun to move. First he bounced, and then he was dancing; feet shifting, arms outstretched. He instinctively sensed the rhythm and the music in the flamingos’ calls to one another, and he couldn’t help but join in. His body demanded it, and he gave himself to it freely and joyfully.  It was beautiful to see.

My son dances quite often, no matter where he is or who is watching. His big brother asked him once, as big brothers do, “Why are you dancing?”

My youngest simply replied, “I do what I want!”

He often operates on pure instinct and emotion. Continue reading

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Holocaust Remembrance and Nazi Eugenics

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Many years ago I had the privilege of meeting a Holocaust survivor during a chance encounter in the store. She was a gracious, gentle woman who had been imprisoned as a child. The numbers on her arm were a painful reminder of the dark acts of which humans are capable.

What stayed with me the most was that the hand-inked numbers on her arm started out uniform, but then became more and more uneven and jagged. My heart wept as I pictured that small child fighting against the torture of each new number with increasing intensity. It broke my heart to know that someone so young had experienced such horrors.

When I became a mother those images took on new meaning. I learned that Nazis not only targeted Jews, but also waged a eugenics campaign against those with disabilities. The evils of the Holocaust somehow seemed even more horrifying with the realization that my own child could have been a target.

Is he more safe in today’s world than he would have been back then? Is society more accepting, more caring, more unified?

Let us strive to be better. Let us not forget the evils of the past, or we risk making the same mistakes again.

I reflected upon these things when I first wrote a post about that life-altering encounter, and I thought it seemed appropriate to revisit on Holocaust Remembrance Day :

On this day I stop to remember, and ponder, and listen. I reflect upon the atrocities committed by a group of people driven by greed and a lust for power, blinded by prejudice. I pause to hear the voices that cried out, yet were silenced too soon. I will not forget them.

Many do not realize the expansiveness of the list of groups targeted by the Nazis. It included not only Jews, but also “Gypsies, Poles and other Slavs, and people with physical or mental disabilities.” During their quest for racial purity the Nazis strove to eliminate the “unfit” as well as any who would oppose their quest for domination. Continue reading